Five Hungry Joes – A pictorial archive of the Trashcan Sinatras. Legendary Scottish Band


That-Band-That-Starts-With-S…
October 23, 2016, 3:15 pm
Filed under: Press | Tags: , , , ,

Let me guess. The Smiths?

Here’s a review of the Trashcans debut album ‘Cake’, which appeared August of 1990 in Japanese music magazine Crossbeat. 

10 out 10 no less.

crossbeat0890bTranslation:

We have been waiting and waiting for this first album from the Trash Can Sinatras, and the two singles that have already been released from it are outstanding. Their guitar sound reminds us of early Aztec Camera or The Housemartins and that clear guitar sound, so familiar to “that-band-that-starts-with-S.” (sic) I don’t think I am exaggerating at all.

The sound and excitement that this album gives you are reminders of that sound. If you categorise them as ‘80s British acoustic music, they are very orthodox. But you can see their originality in the last song on this album which has not only emotional lyrics but also a collage of sound. The Trash Can Sinatras prompt us to appreciate something which we might otherwise take for granted, like the blue sky peering out from behind the clouds, and to remember something important that we are on the verge of forgetting.

crossbeat0890aCrossbeat Magazine (Japan) August 1990 Vol.3 No.8

 



Metallica? Not Bloody Likely…
June 25, 2016, 8:24 pm
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‘Spoofs’ was the original working title for the Trashcan’s debut album before it was changed to ‘Cake’.

Prior to it’s 1990 release, some music publications did review it under the original title. One such publication was Tennents Live! News – a magazine produced as part of the Tennents Live! music sponsorship programme which focused on the Scottish music scene.

Here’s the review, however, Tracey Pepper was hardly wetting her pants at what she’d just heard.

TLn-3TLn-1TLn-2July 1990 Tennents Live! News Issue #9



Coy Enough To Annoy
February 28, 2016, 4:39 pm
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David Roberts wasn’t happy with The Trashcans’ third album, ‘A Happy Pocket’ in this two-star review from Q Magazine. According to David, the band had moved away from their coy, jangly sound to cardboard, cartoon pop.

Well, really!

AHP Qmag 0996Q Magazine, September 1996



Trash…
May 24, 2015, 7:53 pm
Filed under: Press | Tags: , , , , ,

He may be on the front cover, but it’s not Brett Anderson’s ‘Trash’ we’re talking about – although Suede’s Trash is a damn catchy pop tune all the same.

No folks, we’re talking about a full page press advert for the Trashcans’ second album, ‘I’ve Seen Everything’ which appeared in the July edition of well-respected Japanese music magazine, Rockin’ On.

Rock on…

rockin_on0793drockin_on0793crockin_on0793bUnfortunately, I failed my Japanese exam at school so I can’t bring you the translation for this review of ‘I’ve Seen Everything’, which appeared in the same magazine – I’m sure it was decent though.

rockin_on0793aJuly 1993 Rockin’ On Magazine (Japan)



Back To Health
February 10, 2012, 10:39 am
Filed under: Press | Tags: , , , , ,

Another album, another magazine, another review – Weightlifting + Mojo = 4 stars. Back to health indeed.

Here’s MOJO Magazine’s James McNair’s 4-star review…

Long straight-jacketed by bankruptcy and record company sub-clauses, Ayrshire’s Sinatras emerge butterfly-like on their own label with a filler-less cracker. Strident opener Welcome Back aside, it pitches up somewhere between Aztec Camera’s Stray and Prefab Sprout’s Andromeda Heights. Band linchpin Frank Reader, brother of Eddi, is especially affecting on the heartbreak of caring divorce (witness A Coda, sung with all the melting class of a young Art Garfunkel), while Trouble Sleeping manages to tackle child murder in the band’s hometown with sensitivity, its harmonica solo delicately elegiac. With Teenage Fanclub’s Norman Blake guesting on the equally touching Got Carried Away, and exemplary jangler Freetime proving that hope really does spring eternal, Weightlifting gives and gives. Tender, wise, compassionate and magnanimous, it’s a special, special record for anyone who has ever hurt. James McNair

MOJO Magazine Issue 133 December 2004




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